onsdag, januari 30, 2019

Did you grab your f.r.e.e covert knife?

 

Why On Earth Would You Want A Plastic Knife?

First of all, it's not plastic. The Undetectable Dagger is made of fiberglass reinforced polymer which means it's incredibly rigid, much more rigid than normal plastic. Due to it's rigidity it is incredibly strong and light, less than an ounce!

Some of the most dangerous places you go are places that require you to pass through a metal detector - stadiums, arenas, government buildings, airports. All of these locations are prime targets for terrorist attacks. Wouldn't you feel safer if you could bring your own defensive weapons in with you? Well you can when you have the Undetectable Dagger in your pocket or purse.

Women often don't like to carry a big, heavy pocket knife with them, but they're also the easiest targets for attackers. The Undetectable Dagger is the perfect defensive tool for women and will slice through duct tape like butter (duct tape is the number one restraint used by sexual predators.
 


Every God fearing American deserves to feel safe walking the streets of their own town and the Undetectable Dagger is exactly the tool to give you that level of security.

 

















 

The main purpose of the trunk is to raise the leaves above the ground, enabling the tree to overtop other plants and outcompete them for light. It also transports water and nutrients from the roots to the aerial parts of the tree, and distributes the food produced by the leaves to all other parts, including the roots. In the case of angiosperms and gymnosperms, the outermost layer of the trunk is the bark, mostly composed of dead cells of phellem (cork). It provides a thick, waterproof covering to the living inner tissue. It protects the trunk against the elements, disease, animal attack and fire. It is perforated by a large number of fine breathing pores called lenticels, through which oxygen diffuses. Bark is continually replaced by a living layer of cells called the cork cambium or phellogen. The London plane (Platanus × acerifolia) periodically sheds its bark in large flakes. Similarly, the bark of the silver birch (Betula pendula) peels off in strips. As the tree's girth expands, newer layers of bark are larger in circumference, and the older layers develop fissures in many species. In some trees such as the pine (Pinus species) the bark exudes sticky resin which deters attackers whereas in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis) it is a milky latex that oozes out. The quinine bark tree (Cinchona officinalis) contains bitter substances to make the bark unpalatable. Large tree-like plants with lignified trunks in the Pteridophyta, Arecales, Cycadophyta and Poales such as the tree ferns, palms, cycads and bamboos have different structures and outer coverings. A section of yew (Taxus baccata) showing 27 annual growth rings, pale sapwood and dark heartwood Although the bark functions as a protective barrier, it is itself attacked by boring insects such as beetles. These lay their eggs in crevices and the larvae chew their way through the cellulose tissues leaving a gallery of tunnels. This may allow fungal spores to gain admittance and attack the tree. Dutch elm disease is caused by a fungus (Ophiostoma species) carried from one elm tree to another by various beetles. The tree reacts to the growth of the fungus by blocking off the xylem tissue carrying sap upwards and the branch above, and eventually the whole tree, is deprived of nourishment and dies. In Britain in the 1990s, 25 million elm trees were killed by this disease. The innermost layer of bark is known as the phloem and this is involved in the transport of the sap containing the sugars made by photosynthesis to other parts of the tree. It is a soft spongy layer of living cells, some of which are arranged end to end to form tubes. These are supported by parenchyma cells which provide padding and include fibres for strengthening the tissue. Inside the phloem is a layer of undifferentiated cells one cell thick called the vascular cambium layer. The cells are continually dividing, creating phloem cells on the outside and wood cells known as xylem on the inside

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